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Dr Morris' Vision Blog

  • S-L-O-W-I-N-G Nearsightness in Children
    Aug 27 - 17 | Parents have been asking me this question for 23 years... Is there anything to slow the increasing thickness of my [son/daughter]'s glasses?   Although there have been ongoing myopia (nearsightedness) control studies for years, I never felt confident enough to recommend a solution... until now.  Myopia control is now backed with great science and research.   If you have a child 6-16 years old who is currently nearsighted and you would like to do everything to slow the progression that you may have experienced in your own teens... please head to our website to learn more...  http://www.studioeyecare.com/myopia-control   Dr.j



  • The Eclipse & Bright Lights
    Aug 2017 |  All of the recent social media attention to the ocular dangers of a solar eclipse definitely has people thinking about their eyes.  I had two patients today ask about the potential damage from clinical testing lights.  The lights that Optometrists use to examine your eyes may be bright - "like the sun" - but they are not dangerous.  Sunlight has a broad spectrum with lots of powerful visible light and ultra-violet (UV) wavelengths that can cause damage.  Our lights do not have enough power to cause harm.   Dr.j  studioeyecare.com
     
      
  • Eye Make-Up Trend and Stys
    Aug 2017 | There is a make-up trend that giving me business... in a bad way.  The popular look to paint lid margins is giving young women sore, irritated eyes and eye lids.  In the image below you can see the trend to paint lid margin (the strip of lid tissue between the lashes and the eye ball).  The problem is that there are openings to small glands (meibomian) on this strip that become clogged with makeup causing lid inflammation (sore), stys (infections) and irritated eyes (dry eye).  I know that an old Optometrist is not going to change teenagers' make-up styles!... but just be aware to [1] not use if you can [2] try to make sure that this area is cleaned properly after use [3] see an Optometrist if you have any of the symptoms listed above asap!      Dr.j   Studioeyecare.com


  • Blinding Eye Tattoos
    July 2017 |  Re-posted information > credit to author below   Dr.j   StudioEyeCare.com

    Getting an Eye Tattoo Can Blind You

    You may have heard about a new frontier in tattooing: eyeball tattoos. A quick internet search will turn up dozens of photos (some real, some fake) of people with black, blue or multi-colored eyes. But just because some people have gotten away with it, don’t assume it’s safe—or a good idea. Your ophthalmologist says the risks aren’t worth it.

    Paul Freund, MD, and Mark Greve, MD, from the University of Alberta in Canada recently reported on a tragic case. A 24-year-old man underwent an eyeball tattoo procedure and experienced a sudden, painful loss of vision while the tattoo artist was injecting ink into the first eye.

    For eye tattoos, the tattooist injects ink just under the surface of the conjunctiva, so it colors the sclera – the white part of the eye. In this case, the ink had been injected too deep, into the vitreous humor in the middle of the eye.

    The patient sought treatment three days after the tattoo procedure. Drs. Freund and Greve removed the vitreous and the lens of the eye. The lens had been damaged by the needle during the tattoo procedure. The doctors discovered that the mixture of vitreous and tattoo ink was contaminated with bacteria. Two surgeries and multiple procedures to deliver antibiotics were done to try to control the infection and complications from the tattoo procedure.

    Eventually, the entire eye had to be removed because the young man was in so much pain. After the eye was removed, the retina and inside of the eye were found to be stained with ink. There was also cell loss on the corneal epithelium—which keeps the cornea healthy. Even if the eye had been saved, the patient would have had serious vision problems.

    Eyeball tattoos have serious risks and have not been medically or scientifically studied. Because they are not a traditional part of tattooing, artists who are doing eyeball tattoos may not be properly trained. Risks of eyeball tattoos include:

    Decreased vision or complete blindness
    Infection from the injection or ink
    Potential loss of the eye
    Sensitivity to light
    Feeling like something is in your eye


    Written by: Dan Gudgel
    Reviewed by: Paul R Freund, MD